The story of Atlas Shrugged——


The story of Atlas Shrugged dramatically expresses Rand’s ethical egoism, her advocacy of “rational selfishness”, whereby all of the principal virtues and vices are applications of the role of reason as man’s basic tool of survival (or a failure to apply it): rationality, honesty, justice, independence, integrity, productiveness, and pride. Rand’s characters often personify her view of the archetypes of various schools of philosophy for living and working in the world. Robert James Bidinotto wrote, “Rand rejected the literary convention that depth and plausibility demand characters who are naturalistic replicas of the kinds of people we meet in everyday life, uttering everyday dialogue and pursuing everyday values. But she also rejected the notion that characters should be symbolic rather than realistic.” and Rand herself stated, “My characters are never symbols, they are merely men in sharper focus than the audience can see with unaided sight. … My characters are persons in whom certain human attributes are focused more sharply and consistently than in average human beings”.
In addition to the plot’s more obvious statements about the significance of industrialists to society, and the sharp contrast to Marxism and the labor theory of value, this explicit conflict is used by Rand to draw wider philosophical conclusions, both implicit in the plot and via the characters’ own statements. Atlas Shrugged caricatures fascism, socialism, communism, and any state intervention in society, as allowing unproductive people to “leech” the hard-earned wealth of the productive, and Rand contends that the outcome of any individual’s life is purely a function of their ability.

Published by Ernest I.

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